^L in source files

Mark A. Nicolosi markan at penguinmail.com
Mon Jul 7 01:49:28 PDT 2003


On Mon, 07 Jul 2003 09:56:01 +0200
Simon Willcocks <simonwillcocks at enterprise.net> wrote:

> In message <20030707023339.46c39609.markan at penguinmail.com>
>           markan at penguinmail.com ("Mark A. Nicolosi") wrote:
> 
> > On Mon, 07 Jul 2003 09:37:00 +0200
> > Simon Willcocks <simonwillcocks at enterprise.net> wrote:
> > 
> > > In message <20030706215659.3bb12e81.markan at penguinmail.com>
> > >           markan at penguinmail.com ("Mark A. Nicolosi") wrote:
> > > 
> > > > Just a simple question: How come many projects use ^L characters
> > > > to separate different parts of source files?
> > > 
> > > It's the page feed character.
> > Oh. I feel dumb :) 
> 
> Don't worry, I still don't know what several of the ACSII control
> characters do! :-)
> 
> ^L also used to be "clear screen" on the BBC micro (still is in RISC
> OS), and probably DOS.

Bash clears the screen when you type ^L, but I guess that's just bash,
because echo a ^L doesn't do squat, except when TERM is "linux" it
emits a blank line.

> > Is there any other benefit to using them,  except
> > when printing?
> 
> After some messing around, yes!  more (but not less) stops at each
> one, without waiting for the full 25 (or whatever) lines, so as long
> as the sections are reasonably short you can run through the file
> quite quickly.

Cool, nice tip.

> > > > "There are 10 kinds of people in the world; those how can read
> > > > binary code, and those who can't."
> > > 
> > > I like it!  :-)
> > Me too! ;-) I found that somewhere on Usenet...
> 
> Me, too.  Today.  :-)

Thanks.

-- 
Mark A. Nicolosi <markan_at_penguinmail.com>

"There are 10 kinds of people in the world; those how can read binary
code, and those who can't."
-- 
Unsubscribe: send email to listar at linuxfromscratch.org
and put 'unsubscribe lfs-chat' in the subject header of the message



More information about the lfs-chat mailing list