[Linux From Scratch] #1673: Why is each package in the book?

Linux From Scratch trac at linuxfromscratch.org
Sun Feb 5 17:38:25 PST 2006


#1673: Why is each package in the book?
--------------------------------+-------------------------------------------
 Reporter:  chris at beaker67.com  |        Owner:  lfs-book at linuxfromscratch.org
     Type:  defect              |       Status:  new                          
 Priority:  lowest              |    Milestone:  6.2                          
Component:  Book                |      Version:  SVN                          
 Severity:  normal              |   Resolution:                               
 Keywords:                      |  
--------------------------------+-------------------------------------------
Changes (by jhuntwork at linuxfromscratch.org):

  * milestone:  => 6.2

Old description:

> There should be a page in the book describing exactly what each package
> does and
> why it's in the book. Each package does have a short description of its
> functionality, but it doesn't say what exactly you would use that program
> for or
> what other packages might depend on it. Some are pretty simple...
>
> Coreutils - "a number of programs that are essentiutilities for showing
> and
> setting the basic system characteristics." Could also add that these
> programs
> are not only useful for the user, but are also used by a vast number of
> other
> programs.
>
> Zlib - libraries for compression and decompression, used by a large
> number of
> programs (including a couple of LFS packages)
>
> Vim - the creators of the LFS book believe that a text editor is
> absolutely
> essential to a basic, usable system, and vim just happened to be the one
> that
> they decided to use (maybe also have a link to the "Why is vim in the
> book?"
> thread that's linked in the FAQ, or summarize the contents of the thread
> here)
>
> Some of the packages seem less obvious, Readline being the most common
> example
> ("why is readline in the book?" seems to be a pretty frequent question on
> the
> mailing lists), but I've noticed procps and psmisc are also frequently
> mentioned
> as "optional" packages. Another one is file - I do know that it can be
> useful,
> often for troubleshooting purposes, but (IMHO) it certainly doesn't sound
> that
> way from the description in the book ("why would I need a program to tell
> me
> that most of my files are text files??").
>
> Basically, I just think that the descriptions in the book, while being
> accurate
> technical descriptions of what each program does, they don't, in many
> cases, say
> anything about *why* you would need that functionality.
>
> Any thoughts on this?

New description:

 There should be a page in the book describing exactly what each package
 does and
 why it's in the book. Each package does have a short description of its
 functionality, but it doesn't say what exactly you would use that program
 for or
 what other packages might depend on it. Some are pretty simple...

 Coreutils - "a number of programs that are essentiutilities for showing
 and
 setting the basic system characteristics." Could also add that these
 programs
 are not only useful for the user, but are also used by a vast number of
 other
 programs.

 Zlib - libraries for compression and decompression, used by a large number
 of
 programs (including a couple of LFS packages)

 Vim - the creators of the LFS book believe that a text editor is
 absolutely
 essential to a basic, usable system, and vim just happened to be the one
 that
 they decided to use (maybe also have a link to the "Why is vim in the
 book?"
 thread that's linked in the FAQ, or summarize the contents of the thread
 here)

 Some of the packages seem less obvious, Readline being the most common
 example
 ("why is readline in the book?" seems to be a pretty frequent question on
 the
 mailing lists), but I've noticed procps and psmisc are also frequently
 mentioned
 as "optional" packages. Another one is file - I do know that it can be
 useful,
 often for troubleshooting purposes, but (IMHO) it certainly doesn't sound
 that
 way from the description in the book ("why would I need a program to tell
 me
 that most of my files are text files??").

 Basically, I just think that the descriptions in the book, while being
 accurate
 technical descriptions of what each program does, they don't, in many
 cases, say
 anything about *why* you would need that functionality.

 Any thoughts on this?

-- 
Ticket URL: <http://wiki.linuxfromscratch.org/lfs/ticket/1673>
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